Strange Tax For Expats And Locals

Expats have a dream of living in a new country under that country’s local laws. This dream can be achieved by those who work hard enough to get there. This dream also has a down side: taxes. Each country that you reside in will have its own set of taxes to abide by. The country you leave, such as the United States, will also still impose tax laws that you must follow. Just because you leave a country or even abide in another as a foreigner, it does not mean that you can ignore the taxes and the implications around them. It is important that you are very familiar with the regulation tax for expat requirements, or that you are working with somebody who is.

Window Tax

In 1966, England imposed a window tax. Home owners were taxed according to how many windows their home had. This tax would have been an applicable tax for citizens as well as an applicable tax for expats. The more windows, the greater the tax bill. As citizens always do, they found a way to lower their taxes. They covered up their windows. While this did reduce their tax bill, it created another problem. The lack of light and circulation began to have a negative effect on their health. As the population’s health declined, protesters began to speak up. Finally, in 1851, this tax law was abolished.

The Width of your House Tax

Property taxes are a well-known tax. Property tax for expats is expected and often uncontested. What is less known is a tax that existed prior to this in Amsterdam. Before square footage became a calculation for taxes, Amsterdam taxed their citizens’ homes by the width along the canal. The wider the faade of your home, the higher your taxes. As usual, the citizens found a way to get around this tax. Build a narrower home. This allowed them to still live along the canal, but to pay much less in taxes. Because of this historic law, Amsterdam’s narrow homes have become a world famous tourist attraction�”but few knew how they came to be this way.

Age Pays Off in New Mexico

If you live past the age of 100 in New Mexico, you become exempt from paying income tax. This is a nice break for those who have managed to live a long life. When researching tax for expats, this law is one that is well worth looking into. We all know that life is full of bills and expenses, and this is one welcomed break for those that hang around long enough to earn it.